Skip to main content

Advertisement

Correction to: The Edinburgh Consensus: preparing for the advent of disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer’s disease

Article metrics

The original article was published in Alzheimer's Research & Therapy 2017 9:85

Correction

Since the publication of our article [1], it has come to our attention that we failed to include information for two of the authors in the competing interests section. Craig Richie has declared potential competing interests with the following companies; Janssen, Eisai, Pfizer, Eli Lilly, Roche Diagnostics, Boeringher Ingleheim, Novartis, AC Immune, Ixico, Aridhia, Amgen, Berry Consultants, Lundbeck, Sanofi, Quintiles (IQVIA) and Takeda. Jeremy Issacs has declared potential competing interests with the following companies; Roche and Merck & Co. The full competing interests section for this article can be found below.

Declarations

Competing interests

Bob Barber has participated in an advisory panel for Novartis on one occasion and conducted a number of pharmaceutical sponsored commercial clinical trials in Alzheimer’s disease (including Lilly, Roche and Janssen). He has a national role for NIHR NHS relating to commercial studies in dementia. Nick Fox has received research support from AVID/Lilly and has advised GSK, Lilly, Novartis and Roche; he serves on a data monitoring committee for Biogen—all payments for these activities are to UCL. Clive Holmes has attended advisory boards for Lilly pharmaceuticals. Martin Rossor serves on a safety monitoring committee for Servier and has advised Merck on patient registries. Tom Russ works within NHS Scotland with the Scottish Neuroprogressive and Dementia Network on commercial studies in dementia. Craig Richie is the co-coordinator and academic lead for the EPAD (European Prevention of Alzheimer's Dementia) Project which has numerous commercial partners in keeping with the mechanisms of the European Union's Innovative Medicine's Initiative. These companies are: Janssen, Eisai, Pfizer, Eli Lilly, Roche Diagnostics, Boeringher Ingleheim, Novartis, AC Immune, Ixico, Aridhia, Amgen, Berry Consultants, Lundbeck, Sanofi, Quintiles (IQVIA) and Takeda. Jeremy Issacs is a Principal Investigator on clinical trials, outside of the submitted work, sponsored by both Roche and Merck & Co, who supply funding to his employing organisation to conduct the study. The remaining co-authors declare that they have no competing interests. All authors have completed the ICJME declaration of conflicts of interest.

Reference

  1. 1.

    Ritchie C, et al. The Edinburgh Consensus: preparing for the advent of disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer's Research & Therapy. 2017;9:85. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13195-017-0312-4.

Download references

Author information

Correspondence to Craig W. Ritchie.

Rights and permissions

Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Ritchie, C.W., Russ, T.C., Banerjee, S. et al. Correction to: The Edinburgh Consensus: preparing for the advent of disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer’s disease. Alz Res Therapy 10, 73 (2018) doi:10.1186/s13195-018-0372-0

Download citation