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Table 1 Boston Criteria for diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related hemorrhage[22]

From: Cerebral microbleeds: overview and implications in cognitive impairment

1. Definite CAA Full post-mortem examination demonstrating:
• Lobar, cortical, or corticosubcortical hemorrhage
• Severe CAA with vasculopathya
• Absence of other diagnostic lesion
2. Probable CAA with supporting pathology Clinical data and pathologic tissue (evacuated hematoma or cortical biopsy) demonstrating:
• Lobar, cortical, or corticosubcortical hemorrhage
• Some degree of CAA in specimen
• Absence of other diagnostic lesion
3. Probable CAA Clinical data and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) demonstrating:
• Multiple hemorrhages restricted to lobar, cortical, or corticosubcortical regions (cerebellar hemorrhage allowed)
• Age >55 years
• Absence of other cause of hemorrhageb
4. Possible CAA Clinical data and MRI or CT demonstrating:
• Single lobar, cortical, or corticosubcortical hemorrhage
• Age >55 years
• Absence of other cause of hemorrhageb
  1. Criteria were established by the Boston Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy Group: Steven M Greenberg, Daniel S Kanter, Carlos S Kase and Michael S Pessin. aAs defined in [26]. bOther causes of intracerebral hemorrhage were excessive warfarin (international normalized ratio (INR).3.0); antecedent head trauma or ischemic stroke; central nervous system tumor, vascular malformation, or vasculitis; and blood dyscrasia or coagulopathy. (INR.3.0 or other non-specific laboratory abnormalities are permitted for diagnosis of possible cerebral amyloid angiopathy).